Considering a Future Pregnancy

Right time to try again

Unless there is a medical indication that has been discussed with you by your doctor, i.e. molar pregnancy, ectopic pregnancy or personal illness, there is no right answer as to when the best time to try to conceive again may be.  Some women want to try to conceive straight away while others may choose to wait a few months or years.  

 

There are many factors to consider in making your decision; your own feelings, your partners’ feelings and perhaps family/social circumstances. It is a very personal and individual decision. 

Doctors advise to have at least one period before trying for another baby. This is because the first cycle after a miscarriage varies, and it may be difficult to calculate the gestation of your pregnancy. However, if you conceive during the first cycle, this does not make you more likely to miscarry.

Miscarriage Association: ‘Thinking about another pregnancy’.

Fear of Miscarriage

It is natural to experience anxiety when planning for and indeed being pregnant again, after a loss. For most women, miscarriage can be a very upsetting and frightening experience. Apart from the physical impact on a woman’s body, miscarriage is usually accompanied by feelings of grief and loss which are often experienced for weeks and even months after a miscarriage.  Such feelings are normal.

 

Naturally, all of this may make you anxious about another pregnancy.

Risk of Miscarriage

Miscarriage occurs in one in four pregnancies (i.e. 25% of all pregnancies).

 

  • If you have had one miscarriage, the risk of having another miscarriage does not increase.

  • After two consecutive miscarriages (i.e. one after another) and with no living child, the risk of another miscarriage increases from 20% to 28%.

  • Following three consecutive miscarriages, the risk of another miscarriage rises to 43%.

Though the risk of another miscarriage increases after three consecutive miscarriages, the odds are still in your favour of having a healthy pregnancy outcome.

 

As you get older, particularly over 40 years of age, the risk of miscarriage is higher.  

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Pregnancy Loss Research Group

Cork University Maternity Hospital

Wilton, Cork, Ireland

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